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Vanderbilt Students Honor Montpelier Staff Researchers at EFRI Conference

The undergraduate research symposium is a showcase of students’ work in a variety of fields. The winners will be awarded prizes in various categories, such as the most original research or the most original poster presentation. Among the projects presented are those by Nathan Angell ’22, an associate professor of geosciences whose project involved training an artificial intelligence algorithm to detect pneumonia in X-rays of the chest. Other prize-winning students include Jacob Ian Santos ’21, a graduate student in immunology, and Kaitlyn Fales ’21, who studied the influence of heavy metals on the development of molars in embryo mice.

research they conducted|research they conducted

Vanderbilt Students Honor Montpelier Staff Researchers at EFRI Conference

The undergraduate research symposium is a showcase of students’ work in a variety of fields. The winners will be awarded prizes in various categories, such as the most original research or the most original poster presentation. Among the projects presented are those by Nathan Angell ’22, an associate professor of geosciences whose project involved training an artificial intelligence algorithm to detect pneumonia in X-rays of the chest. Other prize-winning students include Jacob Ian Santos ’21, a graduate student in immunology, and Kaitlyn Fales ’21, who studied the influence of heavy metals on the development of molars in embryo mice.

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The students will present their findings at the conference. Several of the researchers are Montpelier staff members, including Jens Meiler, who previously published in a high school journal in Germany. Their experience motivated them to conduct their own research and they wanted to give the opportunity to Vanderbilt students to experience something similar. The symposium is a way to give students the chance to showcase their own research and learn from peers. The audience is encouraged to ask questions of the authors, which are usually a good way to gauge the level of student interest.

A recent research event organized by the Center for Science Outreach at Vanderbilt University will honor six student researchers who were involved in research at the University of Washington. The researchers will present their findings at the Emerging Frontiers in Innovation (EFRI) Conference on March 9 at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. This year’s conference will showcase the work of young scientists from the College of Engineering and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

The research symposium is hosted by the Vanderbilt University College of Engineering and was originally called the Minority Undergraduate Research Symposium. The Symposium is held each year to recognize the contributions of first-year and minority undergraduate researchers, as well as the efforts of first-year researchers. In addition to the First-year Undergraduate Research Program, the Women in Science and Engineering Student Congress will be held annually, which will honor the research of all female students.

SSMV is a collaboration between CSO and Metro Nashville Schools to provide advanced STEM education to high school students. Submissions to the Young Scientist competition are most often from participants in SSMV or the summer program at CSO. However, any high school student who conducts research on the Vanderbilt campus is eligible to submit. There are no regional limitations on the types of research submitted. They can come from any part of the country.

Both Cohen and Vanags are motivated by their own experiences in high school. In their own research, they discovered that high school students are particularly interested in the issues surrounding death and dying. Their first experiences in publishing were motivating, and they wanted to make this experience a positive one for other college students. In the past, both of them have received recognition at EFRI conferences. Despite these obstacles, the young scientist can be proud of the results of their work.